Future-proofing Mackay's operations

Future-proofing Mackay’s operations

In December, Inside Waste spoke to Council about the seven-month evaluation period and procurement process two years in the making that would ensure best practices are implemented at the Hogan’s Pocket landfill and Paget Transfer station, including bulk waste haulage between the two locations (see Related Articles).

At the time, Inside Waste provided an overview of the procurement process as well as key aspects of the new contract arrangements. But these key aspects, specifically haulage and leachate management, are worth digging into. Read more

Giving control back to councils

Giving control back to councils

Dr Hofstede, who completed his PhD in 1994, was studying organic waste composting, specifically how to develop a system at a time when landfill disposal costs were relatively low and environmental standards for composting plants were high.

While Dr Hofstede developed the Fabcom system 16 years ago, it is only in the last few years that Spartel has started commercialising the system. Today, the patented system, which comes in three versions, two of which can be found in Maryborough, Victoria (the Fabcom Tunnel) and Bunbury-Harvey in WA (the Fabcom Piccolo). Read more

A fine solution

A fine solution

Benedict Industries, which processes C&D waste, celebrated its 50th anniversary last year and five decades on, the company is going from strength to strength.

In NSW, the company has a hub facility in Chipping Norton where its invested “tens of millions of dollars” in equipment to improve processing, a facility in Newcastle that opened about a year ago, a plant in Belrose, and a transfer station in Unanderra in Wollongong. Benedict has also lodged two development applications with the Department of Planning for transfer stations in Smeaton Range near Camden and Penrith. Read more

Recycler tackles aquaculture's waste

Recycler tackles aquaculture’s waste

Envorinex collects waste materials from the aquaculture industry such as salmon pens, black poly pipes used for irrigation, and feedlines, citing Tassal and Petuna Seafoods Tasmania as their main sources of feedstock.

“We collect them and bring them to our plant where we shred these materials and melt them down through an extrusion process and turn them back into a pellet that we then reuse to manufacture products. We’re processing about 800kg per hour,” Envorinex managing director Jenny Brown told Inside Waste, adding that everything the company collects is recycled and all products it manufactures are guaranteed recyclable. Read more

Exploring the gold mine that is the Northern Territory

Exploring the gold mine that is the Northern Territory

And now, it appears that the government is taking steps to ensure that it works closely with industry to address the issues in the territory.

It has, for one, underwritten the broad costs of Waste, Recycling Industry Association NT’s (WRINT) Northern Territory Waste Management and Resource Recovery Conference that will be held in March and two ministers, including Minister for Environment Lauren Moss will be attending the event, which WRINT CEO Rick Ralph says is evidence that the current government is putting its money where its mouth is. Read more

Waste Opportunist: The coffee catch (c)up

Waste Opportunist: The coffee catch (c)up

In response, the UK has seen an industry-led ‘Paper Cup Manifesto’, promising to deliver single-use cups that take into account end-of-life recycling options, creation of specific collection schemes, and more discussion on how to prevent these cups ending up as litter. Whilst this is admirable, in my experience most industry-led initiatives usually only arise out of a fear of being regulated. Even pledging a minimum recycled content in a new breed of fully recyclable single use coffee cups or developing a new litter strategy to address this particular scourge seems to be missing the point. Or is it just me? Read more

50 going on 100

50 going on 100

In 1966, when scrap dealer Max Sell told Ross Parker, a young electrician working in a steel foundry, that he wanted to hang up his boots and head into retirement, Parker had a plan.

First, he decided to buy Sell’s trucks for £2000 – equivalent to some AU$50,000 today – but proposed that Sell stick around for six months to teach him the ropes.

Together, Sell and Parker and their two trucks travelled across Sydney buying scrap, with Sell introducing Parker as his son-in-law given back in the day, the scrap business was a rather personal one. Read more

Talking shop with Stan Krpan

Talking shop with Stan Krpan

Krpan has spent five years at the helm of SV and is now ready to charge forward in his new term as CEO.

Inside Waste spoke to Krpan to find out what’s in store for SV and the sector as a whole.

IW:  2015-16 was a big year with the release of a number of documents, policies, and the like. What can the sector expect from SV in 2017? Read more

Tracking EMRC's WtE journey

Tracking EMRC’s WtE journey

However, EMRC’s director of waste services Stephen Fitzpatrick hopes that the lessons learnt in the process might help others who have the same aspirations to enter the wood waste to energy space.

Fitzpatrick fronted a crowd of delegates in Sydney at the WMAA Energy from Waste national conference in October 2016, speaking about the technological and regulatory considerations EMRC had to go through during the development of the Hazelmere plant.

In March, the plant received environmental approval from the WA EPA. Read more

Ageing kerbside collections

Ageing kerbside collections

The stats

The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) surveys information from people with disability, carers and older people to determine not only how ageing impacts a person’s life, but how the combination of age and other factors affect the quality of life a person experiences (see the Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers [SDAC]). Within this survey, older people are defined as those aged 65 years or over. Read more