Lights out for recycling at Christmas?

Lights out for recycling at Christmas?

But this year is shaping up to be a little different. Christmas tree lights get a lot of turnover, because once a few bulbs go out, they’re cheap enough to dispose of and replace rather than fix. Traditionally, they’ve been one of those single-item streams, collected at drop-off points by businesses or charities, that get sent in bulk to a specialised processor.

And as with many things in this industry, those specialised processors are often located in China. With the recent crackdown on waste imports with contamination rates above 0.5%, following on from 2013’s Green Fence and 2017’s National Sword initiatives, the post-use chains of many such items are in question (as, to be fair, is much of the industry). Read more

Kwinana WtE update: tech provider picked; construction to commence

Kwinana WtE update: tech provider picked; construction to commence

Speaking to Inside Waste about what will be Australia’s first WtE plant, Phoenix Energy managing director Peter Dyson said the construction timeline has been set for 36 months and he is confident that all will go smoothly.

“At this stage, the contractors do not have any concerns about orders as they have sorted out the main ticket items,” Dyson said. Read more

Kwinana WtE update: tech provider picked; construction to commence

Speaking to Inside Waste about what will be Australia’s first WtE plant, Phoenix Energy managing director Peter Dyson said the construction timeline has been set for 36 months and he is confident that all will go smoothly.

“At this stage, the contractors do not have any concerns about orders as they have sorted out the main ticket items,” Dyson said.

The plant is expected to be completed in 2021 and Dyson noted that commissioning will begin six months ahead of that in 2020.

For now, Phoenix Energy is signing off on all relevant construction and financing contracts, which will have to be completed by the end of March. Read more

App nation – powering waste diversion

Inside Waste spoke to the people behind four waste apps accessible Australia-wide to hear about their progress and plans for 2018.

ShareWaste

It was a Facebook experiment that led to the creation of ShareWaste, a website and app which connects those who don’t have the time, space or composting know-how, with those that have backyard chickens, worm farms, or compost and bokashi bins – plus room for more waste. Read more

Injecting value: are we getting enough from our medical waste?

Consider, in comparison, the kind of waste receptacles you might expect to see in the typical Australian workplace. One bin for mixed recycling, another for paper and cardboard, and a third for landfill would be pretty typical. A collection point for e-waste, soft plastics or even organics wouldn’t surprise. Depending on the industry, some high-volume problem wastes also might find a home – batteries, printer cartridges, chemical containers, coffee grounds or pods.

Read more

Where we're at with the NSW CDS

Where we’re at with the NSW CDS

While the map is now up – there were concerns a week ago about the lack of details –  there are still some questions on who will or should profit from the scheme.
Who should profit? 

Questions have been raised about which entity should be eligible to earn the refund values, MRFs or C&I waste collectors, as this is not factored into the MRF protocol. Read more

NSW needs fresh e-waste definition

NSW needs fresh e-waste definition

In December 2016, in Glassborow’s Inside Waste Legal Eagle column, she raised the problems caused by a lack of a statutory definition of e-waste. Since the article was published, there has still been no progress on the regulation of this unique waste stream.

Khoury has recently also spoken out, requesting that the NSW EPA provide a clear definition of e-waste as e-waste should be defined as a Special Waste within the NSW Waste Classification Guidelines. Read more

Three's (good) company

Three’s (good) company

Garwood is a household name in the waste trucks space and many would have seen or used its range of side and rear loaders, including the Dual Pact and Miner. McHugh told Inside Waste the acquisition of these new sweeper brands made sense because it now allows Garwood to offer a full package of equipment, from rear and side load trucks to sweepers.

He added that Garwood has maintained a long and healthy history of collaboration with these brands over the years, pointing to its maintenance and servicing work undertaken for the Schwarze brands over the past two decades. As such, McHugh has always been confident that these companies could do business together. Read more

Are you ready for responsive collections?

Are you ready for responsive collections?

Rubbish bins featuring compactors and fill sensors, powered by solar panels, are on the cusp of widespread deployment across Australia. Densely populated or highly-trafficked councils are leading the way, with the beachside tourist hotspots of Bondi and the Gold Coast joining a spate of recent or ongoing trials.

It’s prompted a sudden boom in Australian smart and solar bin competitors, with players big and small rushing to provide at-source compacting, sensor and telecommunications technology, monitoring software, or a power source of some kind. The concept is well over a decade old, but the slow development of the local market has meant little appetite until recently. Read more

Beyond Plastic Pollution: populism, policy, opportunities discussed

Beyond Plastic Pollution: populism, policy, opportunities discussed

If the takeaway coffee cup sculpture or Globelet’s returnable lanyards and reusable cups weren’t enough to signal this was an environmental conference, the compost bin for food scraps sure did.

Speaking to attendees, the strength of the Boomerang Alliance’s three-day Beyond Plastic Pollution: Pathways to Cleaner Oceans conference was its ability to gather an incredibly diverse range of people working on the issue. NGOs, businesses, industry, community groups and government sectors all gathered, with many a business card changing hands and promising collaborations discussed.  Read more