WMAA landfill conference: dealing with a leachate breakout

WMAA landfill conference: dealing with a leachate breakout

Speaking at the Waste Management Association of Australia’s 2017 Landfill and Transfer Stations conference last week, City of Darwin manager technical services Nadine Nilon told delegates the events that unfolded on January 17, 2014 have been etched on her memory forever.

On that fateful day, the council’s Shoal Bay Waste Management Facility noticed that leachate was leaking out of landfill cell four, marking the start of a six to 12-month process to clean-up, fix and review the situation. Read more

Exploring the gold mine that is the Northern Territory

Exploring the gold mine that is the Northern Territory

And now, it appears that the government is taking steps to ensure that it works closely with industry to address the issues in the territory.

It has, for one, underwritten the broad costs of Waste, Recycling Industry Association NT’s (WRINT) Northern Territory Waste Management and Resource Recovery Conference that will be held in March and two ministers, including Minister for Environment Lauren Moss will be attending the event, which WRINT CEO Rick Ralph says is evidence that the current government is putting its money where its mouth is. Read more

Managing fly ash from EfW plants

Managing fly ash from EfW plants

Speaking at the Waste Management Association of Australia’s national energy from waste conference in October last year, Reece detailed how geological repositories could be used to manage fly ash and pointed to a rock salt mine in Winsford in England’s north west as a positive example.

Tellus is also in the process of developing two repositories in Australia, one in WA and the other in the NT for the long-term containment of hazardous waste. Read more

Turning challenges into opportunities

Turning challenges into opportunities

Covering some 34,000 square metres, the region has a population of about 16,000 people with East Arnhem Regional Council serving a total of over 9000 people distributed through nine communities. Over the last 10 years, population has increased at a rate slightly above the national average in percentage terms. And with a growing population comes increased waste generation.

Nine communities – Angurugu, Galinwin’ku, Gapuwiyak, Gunyangara, Milingimbi, Milyakburra, Ramingining, Umbakumba, and Yirrkala – currently reside in East Arnhem Land, with five of these communities located on islands. Read more