The state of the waste data

The state of the waste data

The SOE concludes that: “Despite an overall increase in waste generation, Australia’s total disposal tonnage decreased from about 21.5 megatonnes to about 19.5 megatonnes (about 9.5%) between 2006-07 and 2010-11. During this period, the resource recovery rate in Australia increased from 51% to 60%. The quantity of material recycled increased significantly from 21.4 megatonnes to 27.3 megatonnes per year, or by about 27%.” (Australian State of the Environment 2016, p.90) Read more

Building a clear vision for waste and resource recovery infrastructure

Building a clear vision for waste and resource recovery infrastructure

One issue that should be high on the public and government agenda, which requires further debate and discussion is who really is responsible for the provision and planning for waste and resource recovery infrastructure in Australia?

Increasingly, we hear “let’s leave it to the market”. Is this, however, really the right approach, given the importance of waste and resource recovery facilities for both public health and amenity, as well as the need for these facilities to support the urban growth predicted by governments in almost all Australian states? As we all know, if there is ever an industry that encounters NIMBYism, it is this industry. So, is it really appropriate for government to simply “leave it to the market”? Read more

Inside Waste (Feb): A tight race to the top

Inside Waste (Feb): A tight race to the top

Six years ago, Inside Waste launched the annual review and over that time, it’s been a process of constant refinement.

If you have followed the review since its inception (thank you for your support!), you’ll notice that this year, the survey was only sent to non-consultants, meaning consultancies big or small were not allowed to participate. Firms that slipped through the cracks were removed at the end of the survey. Read more

Waste Opportunist: The salt of the earth

Waste Opportunist: The salt of the earth

In January 2015, Queensland began exporting Coal Seam Gas (CSG, otherwise known as coal bed methane) to Asian markets. The volumes with these exports are expected to realise 1400BCF in 2017 alone, and combined with gas (including off-shore conventional gas) developments in Western Australia and the Northern Territories, are expected to ensure Australia’s elevation to be the world’s leading exporter of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) by 2020.  Read more

Green Box Thinking: Outcomes from the APC think tank

Green Box Thinking: Outcomes from the APC think tank

Say the word green to most people and they think of trees, the environment, the earth, and sustainability.

However, before you reach for a tree to hug, we need to challenge this belief.

Dr Leyla Acaroglu (2016 UNEP Environment Champion of the Earth), speaking at the Australian Packaging Covenant’s (APC) inaugural Packaging Sustainability Think Tank last month, reinforced the true meaning of sustainability. Read more

Legal Eagle: Resource recovery orders and exemptions - how do they work?

Legal Eagle: Resource recovery orders and exemptions – how do they work?

Currently, there are two separate types of documents that set out the strict conditions required to be met before specific types of waste can be used for a particular purpose. These are called resource recovery orders and resource recovery exemptions which are made under clauses 91 to 93 of the Protection of the Environment Operations (Waste) Regulation 2014 (NSW).

Resource recovery orders outline conditions that must be met by generators and processors of waste in order to lawfully supply recycled waste for the purposes of land application, use of the waste as fuel or in connection with a process of thermal treatment. Resource recovery exemptions set out the conditions that must be met by consumers and receivers of recycled waste who wish to apply this waste to land, or use the waste as fuel or in connection with a process of thermal treatment. Read more

ANU study finds 100% renewable energy is Australia's cheapest option

ANU study finds 100% renewable energy is Australia’s cheapest option

Led by ANU’s Andrew Blakers, Bin Lu and Matthew Stocks, the study suggests that with most of Australia’s current fleet of coal generators due to retire before 2030, a mix of solar PV and wind energy that is supported by pumped hydro storage would be the cheapest option for the country moving forward.

According to ANU lead researcher Professor Andrew Blakers, the zero-emissions grid would mainly rely on wind and solar PV technology, with support from pumped hydro storage, and would eliminate Australia’s need for coal and gas-fired power. Read more

In conversation with Dale Gilson

In conversation with Dale Gilson

Inside Waste caught up with Gilson to find out more about the man behind the wheel.

IW: Tell us more about yourself… what were you doing before joining TSA?

Gilson: My working career began by spending 13 years in a third generation small business my family owned. It began as an IBM typewriter dealership (the kind you now see in antique shops) and progressed to sales and service of photocopiers, printers and facsimile machines. This is where I first learnt about customer service which was has been of great benefit to me as I moved in to the not-for-profit sector. Read more

Future-proofing Mackay's operations

Future-proofing Mackay’s operations

In December, Inside Waste spoke to Council about the seven-month evaluation period and procurement process two years in the making that would ensure best practices are implemented at the Hogan’s Pocket landfill and Paget Transfer station, including bulk waste haulage between the two locations (see Related Articles).

At the time, Inside Waste provided an overview of the procurement process as well as key aspects of the new contract arrangements. But these key aspects, specifically haulage and leachate management, are worth digging into. Read more