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IKEA achieves zero-waste-to-landfill status in the UK

IKEA achieves zero-waste-to-landfill status in the UK

In the UK and Ireland, IKEA achieved zero waste to landfill and recycled 90.6% of the 33,944 tonnes of waste produced – with 9.4% being used for energy recovery.

IKEA aims to produce as much energy from renewable sources as the energy it consumes across all operations worldwide by 2020.

According to IKEA’s head of sustainability Joanna Yarrow, sustainable expansion is a key focus for IKEA, and that waste in recent years has become an extra revenue stream for retailer. Read more

Unilever commits to 100% recyclable plastic packaging by 2025

Unilever commits to 100% recyclable plastic packaging by 2025

Unilever’s CEO Paul Polman said that the company would ensure that “it is technically possible for its plastic packaging to be reused or recycled, and there are established, proven examples of it being commercially viable for plastics re-processors to recycle the material.”

“Our plastic packaging plays a critical role in making our products appealing, safe and enjoyable for our consumers,” Polman said. Read more

Legal Eagle: Application of the Eligible Waste Fuels Guidelines explained

Legal Eagle: Application of the Eligible Waste Fuels Guidelines explained

The EfW Policy Statement deals with two types of waste. Firstly, eligible waste fuels and secondly, non-eligible waste fuels.

Within the definitions section of the EfW Policy Statement, eligible waste fuels are simply defined as: “Waste or waste-derived materials considered by the EPA to pose a low risk of harm to the environment and human health due to their origin, low levels of contaminants and consistency over time.”

Section three of the EfW Policy Statement then goes on to list eight wastes that are categorised by the EPA as eligible waste fuels as follows: Read more

50 going on 100

50 going on 100

In 1966, when scrap dealer Max Sell told Ross Parker, a young electrician working in a steel foundry, that he wanted to hang up his boots and head into retirement, Parker had a plan.

First, he decided to buy Sell’s trucks for £2000 – equivalent to some AU$50,000 today – but proposed that Sell stick around for six months to teach him the ropes.

Together, Sell and Parker and their two trucks travelled across Sydney buying scrap, with Sell introducing Parker as his son-in-law given back in the day, the scrap business was a rather personal one. Read more

Battery power is the answer: Mercedes

Battery power is the answer: Mercedes

The German automaker has made short-term plans to launch and support its F-Cell range of fuel cell vehicles, but in the long term, Mercedes says they are more uncertain, due to hydrogen fuel cell technology losing relevance, and batteries becoming much more capable.

Like many of the other major car manufacturers, Mercedes had invested heavily in hydrogen technology as they worked towards production of zero-emissions vehicles. Read more

Engie announces large-scale renewable projects in Australia and beyond

Engie announces large-scale renewable projects in Australia and beyond

The announcement was made not long after Engie confirmed preparations to shut down their 1500MW Hazelwood brown coal generator in Victoria’s Latrobe Valley, with more than 800 set to lose their jobs in March when it closes.

Engie announced in November 2016 that it would shut down the Hazelwood coalmine and power plant in March 2017, as part of a global decision to get out of fossil fuels. Read more

Q&A: Evolution and convergence of tech - changes to look out for in the ICT sector in 2017

Q&A: Evolution and convergence of tech – changes to look out for in the ICT sector in 2017

This is according to Australian Mobile Telecommunications Association’s (AMTA) manager of recycling Spyro Kalos, who spoke to Inside Waste News’ Jan Arreza about what he’s been working on, the current state of Australia e-waste sector, and his expectation for 2017 and beyond.

Inside Waste: What are you currently working on? Read more

Talking shop with Stan Krpan

Talking shop with Stan Krpan

Krpan has spent five years at the helm of SV and is now ready to charge forward in his new term as CEO.

Inside Waste spoke to Krpan to find out what’s in store for SV and the sector as a whole.

IW:  2015-16 was a big year with the release of a number of documents, policies, and the like. What can the sector expect from SV in 2017? Read more

CoR and the waste sector

With maximum penalties set to rise to $3 million for corporations, and $300,000 and up to five years in jail for individuals, participants in the waste supply chain can’t afford to continue to overlook their CoR compliance obligations.

CoR recap

The CoR laws make every party in the waste supply chain responsible for heavy vehicle safety. If a heavy vehicle breach of mass, dimension, load restraint, maintenance or driver speed or fatigue occurs, every person in the chain for that load can be held liable, even if they did not own/operate the vehicle and even if they were not contractually responsible for the particular process which caused the breach. Read more

Managing fly ash from EfW plants

Managing fly ash from EfW plants

Speaking at the Waste Management Association of Australia’s national energy from waste conference in October last year, Reece detailed how geological repositories could be used to manage fly ash and pointed to a rock salt mine in Winsford in England’s north west as a positive example.

Tellus is also in the process of developing two repositories in Australia, one in WA and the other in the NT for the long-term containment of hazardous waste. Read more