Farewell 2016, hello 2017

Farewell 2016, hello 2017

As the year comes to a close, Inside Waste turned to the sector’s experts – the heads of the major waste and resource recovery associations in Australia – and asked them to reflect on the year gone by as well as share their expectations for 2017.

We posed three questions to Waste Contractors & Recyclers Association of NSW executive director Tony Khoury, Australian Council of Recycling CEO Grant Musgrove, Waste, Recycling Industry Association (Qld) CEO Rick Ralph, Waste Industry Alliance (Vic) head Tim Piper, Australian Organics Recycling Association executive officer Peter McLean, and Australian Landfill Owners Association CEO Max Spedding – we also approached Waste Management Association of Australia CEO Gayle Sloan but she was unable to respond at press time. However, in an interview with Inside Waste earlier this month, Sloan highlighted some of WMAA’s key goals for 2017. More here – and here’s what they have to say. Read more

Turning challenges into opportunities

Turning challenges into opportunities

Covering some 34,000 square metres, the region has a population of about 16,000 people with East Arnhem Regional Council serving a total of over 9000 people distributed through nine communities. Over the last 10 years, population has increased at a rate slightly above the national average in percentage terms. And with a growing population comes increased waste generation.

Nine communities – Angurugu, Galinwin’ku, Gapuwiyak, Gunyangara, Milingimbi, Milyakburra, Ramingining, Umbakumba, and Yirrkala – currently reside in East Arnhem Land, with five of these communities located on islands. Read more

Legal Eagle: NSW e-waste definition critically out of date

Legal Eagle: NSW e-waste definition critically out of date

The lack of definition is only the beginning. There are no regulations in NSW for the disposal, treatment and eventual fate of e-waste, meaning that it is likely to end up at the bottom of a landfill. This is highly undesirable since e-waste has both hazardous and valuable components which present challenges for dealing with e-waste and opportunities to further recycle. Read more

Peninsula sports reserve's solar-powered pressure sewer trial a success

Peninsula sports reserve’s solar-powered pressure sewer trial a success

The Peninsula ECO project involves the connection of more than 16,500 properties on the Mornington Peninsula to an intelligent pressure sewer network that is able to cope with the region’s peak season usage, while also tackling the issue of failing septic tanks that can cause pollution of ground water and waterways.

With Morning Peninsula Shire Council facing repairs to an ageing septic tank system serving the reserve’s busy club rooms, SEW saw an opportunity to showcase its solar powered pressure sewer technology, which uses solar PV panels as the source of energy for the pressure sewer pump and OneBox controller. Read more

Growing a sustainable biogas sector in Australia

Growing a sustainable biogas sector in Australia

Last month, Australia hosted its first meeting of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Task 37: Energy from Biogas.

The group seeks to promote the deployment of anaerobic digestion (AD) technology for renewable energy production and environmental protection, and the provision of expert scientific and technical support to policy makers in member countries.

Globally, there is no single driver for the production and utilisation of biogas. Read more

A step forward for GDT

A step forward for GDT

GDT’s Destructive Distillation process is able to convert end-of-life tyres – a wasted resource and environmental hazard – into high demand valuable raw material by recycling the materials into oil, carbon and steel.

QUT mechanical engineers tested the oil extracted from the old tyres and found that when blended with diesel it would produce a fuel with reduced emissions and no loss of engine performance – more here. Read more

How energy from waste can help the Australian generation mix, emissions intensity and network stability

How energy from waste can help the Australian generation mix, emissions intensity and network stability

Whereas previously annual growth in peak demand (the relevant metric for network investment) could be taken as given, consumption which relies on the grid has largely stalled since 2012 due to a perfect storm of improvements in efficient home appliances and lighting, widespread adoption energy efficiency improvements including insulation in existing housing, and rooftop PV installation, improved heating, cooling and water efficiency in new homes, adoption of in-home demand-side management systems, and economy-wide shifts from manufacturing to service industries. (See Figures 1 & 2) Read more

MAR system trials aim to enhance water security and sustainability

MAR system trials aim to enhance water security and sustainability

Golder is working with clients in New Zealand’s North and South Islands on the MAR trials, which focuses on conjunctive management of ground and surface water at the catchment-wide scale.

Drought is estimated to cost the Australian economy $6.3 billion a year, and the pilot studies are showing potential long-lasting benefits for drought-hit large-scale water users, farmers, and the greater community across Australasia. Read more

Kalbarri to improve grid reliability with microgrid project

Kalbarri to improve grid reliability with microgrid project

The proposed microgrid by Western Power would include a large-scale battery with a minimum capacity of 2MW/h, as well as renewable generation sources such as the Kalbarri wind farm, and rooftop solar on Kalbarri households.

According to Energy Minister Mike Nahan, Kalbarri was chosen because of its reliability issues stemming from being on the end of a very long feeder line.

“Kalbarri is a very popular tourist spot – the population always goes up and down, but it is at the end of a 140km power line that has issues,” Nahan said. Read more