Staff Writer

Recycler tackles aquaculture's waste

Recycler tackles aquaculture’s waste

Envorinex collects waste materials from the aquaculture industry such as salmon pens, black poly pipes used for irrigation, and feedlines, citing Tassal and Petuna Seafoods Tasmania as their main sources of feedstock.

“We collect them and bring them to our plant where we shred these materials and melt them down through an extrusion process and turn them back into a pellet that we then reuse to manufacture products. We’re processing about 800kg per hour,” Envorinex managing director Jenny Brown told Inside Waste, adding that everything the company collects is recycled and all products it manufactures are guaranteed recyclable. Read more

Exploring the gold mine that is the Northern Territory

Exploring the gold mine that is the Northern Territory

And now, it appears that the government is taking steps to ensure that it works closely with industry to address the issues in the territory.

It has, for one, underwritten the broad costs of Waste, Recycling Industry Association NT’s (WRINT) Northern Territory Waste Management and Resource Recovery Conference that will be held in March and two ministers, including Minister for Environment Lauren Moss will be attending the event, which WRINT CEO Rick Ralph says is evidence that the current government is putting its money where its mouth is. Read more

CEFC invests $150M into large-scale solar projects in NSW

CEFC invests $150M into large-scale solar projects in NSW

In a joint statement released by both organisations, it said that Prime Minister Turnbull had called on them both to focus on encouraging the development of these projects to help the country transition to a low-carbon electricity market.

During a speech to the National Press Club, Prime Minister Turnbull declared that the key requirements for Australia’s electricity system are that it should be affordable, reliable, and able to help meet national emissions-reduction targets. Read more

Waste Opportunist: The coffee catch (c)up

Waste Opportunist: The coffee catch (c)up

In response, the UK has seen an industry-led ‘Paper Cup Manifesto’, promising to deliver single-use cups that take into account end-of-life recycling options, creation of specific collection schemes, and more discussion on how to prevent these cups ending up as litter. Whilst this is admirable, in my experience most industry-led initiatives usually only arise out of a fear of being regulated. Even pledging a minimum recycled content in a new breed of fully recyclable single use coffee cups or developing a new litter strategy to address this particular scourge seems to be missing the point. Or is it just me? Read more

Better management of climate risks needs higher standard of disclosure: TCFD

Better management of climate risks needs higher standard of disclosure: TCFD

Today, more companies are looking for guidance on how to incorporate climate change into their financial reporting, existing regulatory frameworks, corporate governance and reporting guidelines.

Recently, Energetics partnered with the Investor Group on Climate Change to host a briefing in Sydney and Melbourne featuring a presentation by Dr Fiona Wood – a member of the Financial Stability Board’s (FSB) Taskforce on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD), and an author of their most recent Recommendations Report. Read more

Our climate is changing. Can the waste sector help?

Our climate is changing. Can the waste sector help?

Despite clear and overwhelming evidence that our climate is changing right now, the appetite for action at a political level is diminishing. In Australia, the Climate Council was defunded, the carbon tax abolished, and a general sense seems to be settling in that climate change doesn’t really matter.

Globally it’s even worse. Climate change is an opinion, a Chinese hoax, a conspiracy. Politicians here and overseas make straight faced assertions that the evidence doesn’t exist, or that it has been manipulated. Read more

IKEA achieves zero-waste-to-landfill status in the UK

IKEA achieves zero-waste-to-landfill status in the UK

In the UK and Ireland, IKEA achieved zero waste to landfill and recycled 90.6% of the 33,944 tonnes of waste produced – with 9.4% being used for energy recovery.

IKEA aims to produce as much energy from renewable sources as the energy it consumes across all operations worldwide by 2020.

According to IKEA’s head of sustainability Joanna Yarrow, sustainable expansion is a key focus for IKEA, and that waste in recent years has become an extra revenue stream for retailer. Read more

Unilever commits to 100% recyclable plastic packaging by 2025

Unilever commits to 100% recyclable plastic packaging by 2025

Unilever’s CEO Paul Polman said that the company would ensure that “it is technically possible for its plastic packaging to be reused or recycled, and there are established, proven examples of it being commercially viable for plastics re-processors to recycle the material.”

“Our plastic packaging plays a critical role in making our products appealing, safe and enjoyable for our consumers,” Polman said. Read more

Legal Eagle: Application of the Eligible Waste Fuels Guidelines explained

Legal Eagle: Application of the Eligible Waste Fuels Guidelines explained

The EfW Policy Statement deals with two types of waste. Firstly, eligible waste fuels and secondly, non-eligible waste fuels.

Within the definitions section of the EfW Policy Statement, eligible waste fuels are simply defined as: “Waste or waste-derived materials considered by the EPA to pose a low risk of harm to the environment and human health due to their origin, low levels of contaminants and consistency over time.”

Section three of the EfW Policy Statement then goes on to list eight wastes that are categorised by the EPA as eligible waste fuels as follows: Read more

50 going on 100

50 going on 100

In 1966, when scrap dealer Max Sell told Ross Parker, a young electrician working in a steel foundry, that he wanted to hang up his boots and head into retirement, Parker had a plan.

First, he decided to buy Sell’s trucks for £2000 – equivalent to some AU$50,000 today – but proposed that Sell stick around for six months to teach him the ropes.

Together, Sell and Parker and their two trucks travelled across Sydney buying scrap, with Sell introducing Parker as his son-in-law given back in the day, the scrap business was a rather personal one. Read more