Events

Waste Expo Australia opens its doors in two days

Waste Expo Australia is just days away from kicking off at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre.

The event, held from October 23-24, will see a line-up of suppliers and speakers showcasing their products and equipment; and thoughts and experiences in the waste industry.

There will be more than 120 brands displaying their products, as well as 100 speakers across three conference stages.

The two-day conference is part of the free-to-attend conference, which will cover seven streams attracting a large gathering of waste management and resource professionals in Australia.

Regis Healthcare national sustainability manager Dr Kaushik Sridhar, who is speaking on Thursday afternoon, said the protection of the environment is an important global and local responsibility.

He is going to discuss options of communicating the Impact of waste reduction to improve waste management in the healthcare industry.

Sridhar said enhancing the quality of life of Regis’ residents is a responsibility that forms a crucial pillar of the organisation’s mission – a responsibility Regis recognises extends beyond what happens between the walls of their facilities.

“We want to continue to lead the transformation in how we live and use our resources in the future.

“Good communication and engagement can result in encouraging stakeholders and partners to collaborate and build a sustainability program that responds to the interests and needs of our staff and residents,” Sridhar said.

Water Corporation senior technical advisor Dr Stacey Hamilton will discuss Perth’s groundwater replenishment scheme on Wednesday afternoon.

She will talk about the project in which groundwater is recycled and then added to the normal water system.

During the presentation, Hamilton will outline, from concept to reality, the steps taken by Water Corporation to put together the groundwater replenishment scheme, beginning with investigations the company undertook as far back as 2004.

“With the effects of climate change the corporation decided to look at other water source options and this included groundwater replenishment,” Hamilton explained.

“Water Corporation has a 50-year plan, ‘Water Forever Whatever the Weather’, which includes increasing recycling, reducing use and developing new sources. Groundwater replenishment is included in this plan.

“As Australia’s first scheme, developing the regulatory framework, understanding the technical challenges and keeping the community engaged are all part of keeping the scheme compliant,” Hamilton said.

Aerofloat manager of operations Michael Anderson will discuss compact trade waste solutions and simplified wash-water recycling.

“Australia’s pledge to change and improve its recycling habits have significant environmental implications as to how businesses will need to run.

“Australia’s low water resources and environmental regulations means that any plastic recycling business must have an effective and reliable wash-water recycling system in place,” Anderson said.

He said attendees will understand how to tackle the problems facing the industry and the opportunities available by having a strong understanding of the technology required.

“Wash water recycling and wastewater technology needs to be economically and environmentally feasible given Australia’s focus on water resources and strict environmental regulations.

“Attendees will see solutions that enable wash-water recycling to be used year-round, not just as a short-term fix within their plant,” Anderson said.

These speakers and many more will be informing attendees about current practices and research on various topics within the waste sector.